The Five Best Places To Go Bass Fishing In Nevada

Nevada is best known as the home of gambling mecca Las Vegas, but the state has much more to offer. It’s a big state, the seventh biggest in America, and much of it is a remote desert with many miles between towns. For the outdoorsman, opportunities abound for hunting and fishing. There are some true gems for bass fishing opportunities, including the following best five bass fishing waters.

1) Lake Mohave

This lake on the Colorado River chain is fishing as well as ever right now, and it’s full of big smallmouth. The tournament results from local clubs to regional team events back it up with many bags eclipsing the magic twenty-pound mark.

Mohave is nestled between lakes Mead and Havasu and is a typical desert fishery with clear water, plenty of rocks, and wide open expanses that make it very rough when the wind picks up. You can expect to catch fish on various fishing tactics, from finesse fishing, topwaters to swimbaits and Alabama Rigs.

2) Lake Mead

Perhaps the best-known lake in the state, Lake Mead has hosted top-level tournaments for decades and was the site of the very first Bassmaster Classic in 1971. Through the years, the lake has gone through many ups and downs, both with the fishing quality and literally with the water levels.

Due to drought and expanded water use in the region, the lake is very low now. It has changed the lake as there is currently virtually no brush or trees along the shoreline, but the bass population is still strong thanks to a nice mix of largemouth and smallmouth.

As with all desert lakes, Lake Mead is extremely clear, making it an excellent choice for fishing with light line and finesse tactics. It is also an excellent topwater lake, one of the best ways to catch bigger than average bass in this stunning desert setting.

3) Wayne E. Kirch Wildlife Management Area

If you want to get away from crowds, this may be your place as it is far from it all. Because of the remote location, it gets very little fishing pressure and what it gets is split between trout, panfish, and bass anglers.

Roughly three hours north of Las Vegas, this desert wildlife management area is home to several smaller bodies of water that all have large populations of bass. There are plenty of smaller bass willing to bite with the occasional trophy mixed in.

4) Eagle Valley Reservoir inside of Spring Valley State Park

This lake is a tiny 61-acre reservoir created in the 1960s and is somewhat of a sleeper due to its small size. Trout are stocked here, and it’s what the fishery is best known for, but bass have made their way to a foothold in the fishery and have grown to huge sizes.

Low water levels have hurt the fishery in recent years, but the bass are still there. With trout being a primary forage for bass, swimbaits are one of the best ways to hook into a trophy.

5) Rye Patch Reservoir

Located less than two hours from Reno, Rye Patch is home to diverse fish species, including catfish, crappie, hybrid stripers, walleye, and bass. It is a 22-mile long fishery with 11,000 acres to explore when full. It is a typical Nevada fishery with a remote setting and plenty of wildlife around.

Bass fishing picks up in the spring months, and they can be fooled with various tactics, including finesse fishing, crankbaits, and jigs.

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